Association of Reactive-Proactive Aggression and Anxiety Sensitivity with Internalizing and Externalizing Symptoms in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder


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Bilgic A., Tufan A. E. , Yilmaz S., Özcan Ö., Özmen S., Oztop D., ...More

CHILD PSYCHIATRY & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT, vol.48, pp.283-297, 2017 (Journal Indexed in SSCI) identifier identifier identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 48
  • Publication Date: 2017
  • Doi Number: 10.1007/s10578-016-0640-9
  • Title of Journal : CHILD PSYCHIATRY & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
  • Page Numbers: pp.283-297
  • Keywords: ADHD, Disruptive behavioral disorder, Reactive aggression, Proactive aggression, Anxiety sensitivity, OPPOSITIONAL DEFIANT DISORDER, CONDUCT DISORDER, DEVELOPMENTAL PATHWAYS, BEHAVIORAL-INHIBITION, PREDICTIVE-VALIDITY, SOCIAL PHOBIA, COMORBIDITY, DEPRESSION, CHILDHOOD, ADHD

Abstract

This study evaluates the associations among the symptoms of anxiety, depression, and disruptive behavioral disorders (DBD) in the context of their relationships with reactive-proactive aggression and anxiety sensitivity in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The sample consisted of 342 treatment-naive children with ADHD. The severity of ADHD and DBD symptoms were assessed via parent-and teacher-rated inventories. Anxiety sensitivity, reactive-proactive aggression and severity of anxiety and depression symp-toms of children were evaluated by self-report inventories. According to structural equation modeling, depression and anxiety scores had a relation with the DBD scores through reactive-proactive aggression. Results also showed a negative relation of the total scores of anxiety sensitivity on DBD scores, while conduct disorder scores had a positive relation with anxiety scores. This study suggests that examining the relations of reactive-proactive aggression and anxiety sensitivity with internalizing and externalizing disorders could be useful for understanding the link among these disorders in ADHD.