Potential effects of excessive water withdrawal from boreholes drilled in the Antalya (Turkey) travertine plateau and well interactions


Ozcelik M.

EURO-MEDITERRANEAN JOURNAL FOR ENVIRONMENTAL INTEGRATION, 2022 (Peer-Reviewed Journal) identifier

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Publication Date: 2022
  • Doi Number: 10.1007/s41207-022-00314-6
  • Journal Name: EURO-MEDITERRANEAN JOURNAL FOR ENVIRONMENTAL INTEGRATION
  • Journal Indexes: Emerging Sources Citation Index
  • Keywords: Drilling, Extreme water withdrawal, Well interaction, Travertine, Antalya, INFLUENCE RADIUS, PUMPING WELL

Abstract

Food and water demand has risen in recent years as a result of global population growth, economic development, and dietary changes. These trends, combined with the continued use of groundwater resources, have resulted in significant aquifer depletion rates in every country. Antalya's current water resources are springs and underground waters on the travertine plateau. On the karstic travertine plateau, there are numerous natural water sources and water drilling wells for domestic and agricultural use. In addition to the licensed drillings, there are numerous unlicensed wells on the plateau. Unlicensed wells have the same impact as licensed wells. As a result of excessive well water withdrawal and unlimited consumption, there has been insufficient aquifer recharge, which has resulted in a reduction in groundwater reserves, leading to disputes and legal action between well owners. Within the scope of this study, the potential effects of excessive water withdrawal from selected boreholes and well interactions on the Antalya travertine plateau were evaluated using field observations, well tests, and geographic information system methods. It was calculated that the radius of action for the water wells to be drilled on the travertine plateau should be at least R = 107.48 m. This case study, carried out on the Antalya travertine plateau, is meant to serve as a model for legal disputes, relevant public institutions, municipalities, and scientific studies concerning excessive water withdrawal and well interactions.