Effects of probiotic bacteria and oils on fatty acid profiles of cultured cream


EKINCI F. Y. , OKUR O. D. , Ertekin B. , Guzel-Seydim Z.

EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF LIPID SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, cilt.110, ss.216-224, 2008 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 110 Konu: 3
  • Basım Tarihi: 2008
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1002/ejlt.200700038
  • Dergi Adı: EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF LIPID SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
  • Sayfa Sayısı: ss.216-224

Özet

The aim of this study was to determine the effects of using various probiotic bacteria and plant oils in cultured cream on the fatty acid profiles including conjugated linoleic acids (CLA). L. acidophilus, B. bifidum, S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus, P thoenii (jensenii) P 126, and P jensenii B 1264 and a mixed culture (blend of L. acidophilus, B. bifidum, S. thermophilus and L. bulgaricus) were used in the fermentation of cream samples at a level of 2%. Cream samples were fortified with sunflower oil, soybean oil and hazelnut oil at a level of 2%. Microbial counts and fatty acid profile analysis were performed. The microbial results demonstrated that fermented cream could be a superior product for the presence of probiotics. Even though the cream samples contained 52% milk fat, in the majority of the samples growth of probiotic bacteria was higher than 10(6) cfu/g. Concentrations of short-chain fatty acids such as butyric, caproic and capric acids in cultured cream samples differed depending on the cultures used, while long-chain unsarurated fatty acids were significantly affected by the plant oil fortification. The highest CLA content was obtained in the sample produced with B. bifidum, containing 0.73 mg of CLA/g fat. The effect of different plant oils on CLA concentration was significant (p >0.05) for HO + YC, SFO + LBYC and SO + LBYC. Results of the study are important for the dairy industry since it is the first publication on fermented cream with improved functional properties. The development of functional cultured cream with plant oils and probiotic bacteria would provide an important alternative dairy product.