Results of minimally invasive surgical treatment of allograft lithiasis in live-donor renal transplant recipients: a single-center experience of 3758 renal transplantations


Sarier M., Duman I., YÜKSEL Y., Tekin S., Demir M., ARSLAN F., ...Daha Fazla

UROLITHIASIS, cilt.47, ss.273-278, 2019 (SCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi) identifier identifier identifier

  • Cilt numarası: 47 Konu: 3
  • Basım Tarihi: 2019
  • Doi Numarası: 10.1007/s00240-018-1051-0
  • Dergi Adı: UROLITHIASIS
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.273-278

Özet

Allograft lithiasis is a rare urologic complication of renal transplantation (RT). Our aim is to present our experience with minimally invasive surgical treatment of allograft lithiasis in our series of live-donor renal transplant recipients. In a retrospective analysis of 3758 consecutive live-donor RTs performed in our center between November 2009 and January 2017, the results of minimally invasive surgery for the treatment of renal graft lithiasis diagnosed at follow-up were evaluated. Twenty-two (0.58%) patients underwent minimally invasive surgery for renal graft lithiasis. The mean age was 41.6 years, and duration between RT and surgical intervention was 27.3 months (range 3-67). The mean stone size was 11.6 mm (range 4-29). Stones were located in the urethra in 1, bladder in 2, ureter in 9, renal pelvis in 7 and calices in 3 patients. Surgical treatment included percutaneous nephrolithotomy in 1, cystoscopic lithotripsy in 3, flexible ureteroscopic lithotripsy in 6 and rigid ureteroscopic lithotripsy in 12 patients. No major complications were observed. One patient (4.5%) who underwent flexible ureteroscopy developed postoperative urinary tract infection. All patients were stone-free except two (9%) patients who required a second-look procedure after flexible ureteroscopic lithotripsy for residual stones. Stone recurrence was not observed in any patient during a mean follow-up duration of 30.2 months (range 8-84). Renal transplant lithiasis is uncommon and minimally invasive surgical treatment is rarely performed for its treatment. Endourological surgery may be performed safely, effectively and with a high success rate in these patients.